Circular and Linear Walks

A picturesque countryside view on the North Downs Way

Circular and Linear Walks

This walk begins in the quite village of Adisham on the edge of the old coal mining area of East Kent. It joins the North Downs Way for a short section by following little used footpaths and bridleways with some interesting woodland sections. Good views open up north-eastwards to the coast as you return to the village. It is a fairly flat walk with no stiles although paths can be muddy in wet weather.

6 MILES (9.5KM) ALLOW 3 HOURS

Start/Finish: Adisham 
Stiles: 0 
Gates: 3 
Terrain: Open fields and woodland. Undulating with no big slopes 
Views: Some views to the east coast on the return leg Refreshments: Pub near start/finish



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The playwright and poet Christopher Marlowe was born in Canterbury in 1564, the son of a shoemaker. His groundbreaking use of blank verse and dynamic plotlines paved the way for William Shakespeare, yet he is remembered also for his roistering lifestyle, a heady mixture of scandal, religion and espionage. Although it is widely believed he met his end in a brawl in Deptford, the truth may yet turn out to be stranger than fiction.

1.3 MILE (2.1KM) WALK
ALTERNATIVE ROUTE 1.6 MILE (2.6KM)



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Although Harrietsham lies along the A20, it’s not long before you are out of the village and away from the traffic on this route up on the North Downs. Using part of the North Downs Way, the route offers some excellent views of the surrounding countryside from the Downs. There is a chance to rest at the Ringlestone Inn which was built in 1533 and retains many original features. 

5 MILES (8KM)  ALLOW 3 HOURS

  • Start/Finish: Harrietsham station
  • Stiles: 21
  • Gates: 2
  • Terrain: Field paths and tracks. Some moderate slopes
  • Views: Some excellent views
  • Refreshments: Pub and shop in Harrietsham


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This walk takes in the countryside between the village of Harvel and the North Downs Way. You will walk along Wrangling Lane. This name probably derives from the use of the route in times past, by local people taking their grievances (wrangles) to the Lord of the Manor at Luddesdown Court. 

6.6 MILES (10.6KM) 
FROM TROSLEY COUNTRY PARK

Start/Finish: Trosley Country Park
Stiles: 4
Gates: 2
Terrain: Some steep slopes and steps
Views: Some good views
Toilets: At Trosley Country Park
Refreshments: At Trosley Country Park



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This challenging route passes through the beautiful village of Kemsing and offers walkers magnificent views across the Weald of Kent. The village of Kemsing was first recorded in AD 822 and is a fascinating start point for the walk. The Church of St Mary the Virgin dates from 1060 and features a Norman Font. The walk ascends and decends the North Downs and paths can be muddy and slippery after rain.

6.5 MILES (10.4KM)

  • Start/Finish: Centre of the village of Kemsing
  • Stiles: 18
  • Gates: 6
  • Terrain: Field paths and tracks with some steep slopes
  • Views: Magnificent views across the Weald of Kent
  • Toilets: At Kemsing village car park
  • Refreshments: Pubs and shops in Kemsing. Pub at Heaverham


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This walk begins in Otford where you can catch a glimpse of the largest scale model in the world - the Otford Solar System. fter a steep climb up onto the North Downs you are rewarded with some fantastic views of the surrounding countryside.  Descending back to Otford along part of the North Downs Way you also pass by Otford Pond interestingly designated as a listed building! Please note that the route has a short on-road section and the steep climbs may not be suitable for all.

5.3 MILES (8.5KM)

Start/Finish: Otford
Stiles: 9
Gates: 3
Terrain: Fields and tracks with some on-road sections. Undulating paths. Some steep slopes.
Views: Some good views
Toilets: None on route
Refreshments: Pub and shops near start/finish



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This 7.8 mile walk starts with a climb to the top of Tolsford Hill, an impressive natural feature that remains wild and unspoilt. The route boasts magnificent views and travels through chalk grassland where buzzards and skylarks are often seen soaring high above the hills. Journey through the villages of Peene and Saltwood before returning to the country park through a sheltered valley.

7.8 MILES (12.5KM) FROM BROCKHILL COUNTRY PARK

Start/Finish: Brockhill Country Park
Stiles: 14
Gates: 13
Terrain: Fields/tracks with some on road sections. Some steep slopes
Views: Some good views
Toilets: Brockhill Country Park
Refreshments: Brockhill Country Park



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This walk around the village of Wye has some challenging climbs in places but offers some spectacular views from the Downs together with some fascinating local features. 

This walk can also be completed starting at Wye train station or Free parking in Wye Town Centre to pick up the route at Wye Church.

4.3 MILES (6.9KM)  ALLOW 3 HOURS

Start/Finish: Car park on Coldharbour Lane, near Wye
Stiles: 4
Gates: 12
Terrain: Field paths and tracks. Some steep slopes
Views: Some excellent views
Refreshments: Shops and pub in Wye



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An easy-access 3 mile (4.5km) circular walk around a well-known beauty spot on the North Downs Way. Spectacular views, space to run around and picnic. Many places of interest including the Inglis Memorial and National Trust’s Reigate Fort. You may also see Belted Galloway cattle grazing on the open land by the Inglis Memorial, they are used to people.

Allow 1.5 hours.

Start/Finish: Margery Wood NT car park, off A217 Sutton RoadStiles/Gates: 0 stiles, 2 gates
Terrain: Some steep slopes, can be muddy, easy terrain,suitable for rugged buggyViews: Spectacular views from many points
Toilets: Wray Lane car park (about halfway round)
Refreshments: Wray Lane car park



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A 2 mile (3.5km) circular easy-access walk around Gatton Park, near Reigate, a beautiful area of Capability Brown designed parkland. Gatton Park, an area of 600 acres, was landscaped in the mid-1700s and the last private owner of the Gatton estate was Jeremiah Colman, famous for Colman’s Mustard. In 1948 the estate was sold to the Royal Alexandra and Albert School. You’ll find many interesting features of the estate as you walk round the parkland.

Allow 1.5 hours.

Start/Finish: Wray Lane free car park. Parts of Wray Lane one-way
Stiles/Gates: 0
Terrain: Some steep slopes, moderate terrain, can be slippery
Views: Many spectacular views
Toilets: At Wray Lane
Refreshments: Urban Kiosk cafe at Wray Lane



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