Is there signage on the Trail?

The Coast Path is well waymarked and easy to follow. It’s shown as Coast Path on fingerposts.

The entire South West Coast Path follows a series of defined Rights of Way along which you have a legal right of access.

An acorn is the symbol of the National Trails and it will be found on waymark and fingerposts all along the path.

When using the South West Coast Path you will see the following symbols on the Trail or on connecting paths, which can be used by vehicles, horse riders, cyclists or walkers as indicated.

An acorn, the symbol of Britain's National Trails, is used to guide your journey by marking the route in a variety of ways. It is used in conjunction with coloured arrows or the words 'footpath', 'bridleway' or 'byway' to indicate who can use a particular right of way.

 The yellow arrow indicates a path for use by walkers The word 'footpath' and/or a yellow arrow indicates a path for use by walkers only and where, without the landowner's permission, it is illegal to cycle, ride a horse or drive a vehicle.

The blue arrow indicates a path which can be used by walkers, horseriders and cyclists The word 'bridleway' and/or a blue arrow indicates a path which can be used by walkers, horseriders and cyclists but where, without the landowner's permission, it is illegal to drive any vehicle.

The plum arrow indicates a path which can be used by walkers, horseriders, cyclists and carrige drivers. The term 'restricted byway' and/or a plum arrow indicates a path which can be used by walkers, horseriders, cyclists and carrige drivers but where, without the landowner's permission, it is illegal to drive any motorised vechicle.

The red arrow indicates a right of way which can be legally used by walkers, horseriders, cyclists, carriage drivers and motorists. The word 'byway' and/or a red arrow indicates a right of way which can be legally used by walkers, horseriders, cyclists, carriage drivers and motorists.